Heaven

My husband and I have talked about everything under the sun. It should not surprise you that we had some fascinating conversations about Heaven. Both his parents and mine are deceased, and neither set of parents lived to know that we would find each other and marry.

Since many of my readers don’t know me, let me say that when I speak of my husband, I never say things that I wouldn’t have been comfortable talking about with him. Everyone has faults, and while he was a wonderful man, he sure could swear like a sailor!

Because of that, I kindly requested that should he get to heaven before me, I would consider it an immense favor if he would clean up his language when meeting my parents for the first time in the Kingdom.

Since I have reason to believe that happened some time ago, I have quit pondering that particular issue. But I do periodically wonder who else Ronnie will meet in the Kingdom. Do you ever think about stuff like this?

I never got to meet either of my grandfathers. Neither lived to know that I was forecast. I have an uncle I never met, who none of us got to meet, as he died when he was being born.  But beyond that, imagine finally getting to have conversations with people you’ve never met — people in history, people in scriptures, people you’ve heard stories about all your life.  But more than any of that,  imagine getting to stand before the throne of God!

Martin Luther (10 November 1483 – 18 February 1546) used to often talk about animals and also their place in heaven. He had a dog named Toelpel and was asked whether he expected to find dogs in heaven.

“Certainly, for there the earth will not be without form and void. Peter said that the last day would be the restitution of all things. God will create a new heaven and a new earth and new Toelpelsl with hide of gold and fur of silver. God will be all in all; and snakes, now poisonous because of original sin, will then be so harmless that we shall be able to play with them.”

Ron had to bury his dog in South Carolina, and I had to bury my daughter’s cat in Arizona. But a little thing like that wouldn’t stop the Lord of Life.  Think of the tales of Narnia. Talking animals. Why wouldn’t the Lord of Life resurrect the animals so that we could have those conversations we couldn’t quite manage on earth?

 

When the River Won’t Flow: Heaven and Animals

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4 Responses to Heaven

  1. Judith McCorkle says:

    The timing of your blog today was interesting. We studied 2 Peter 3 in bible study, and I commented that I really wanted to meet Noah and the 7 members of his family. Also on my list are Shadrach, Meschach and Abendego. I am certainly open to meeting everyone, but these guys have been on the list for years. Now Ron is, too.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. AECRM says:

    I find that very interesting! When you start thinking about it, the list gets very long. One of my favorite college profs died years ago and there are conversations we never finished. Imagine the possibilities!

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  3. This is why I like Luther better than Aquinas. Luther believed in the possible of the impossible — that pets and all animals would find a new, glorified, transfigured existence right along with us in the new world of the Kingdom. Rationalist old Aquinas made it quite plain in several places (including the ST) that only creatures with a rational nature — i.e. humans — would be saved, as that was what the Son of God assumed in Jesus Christ; creatures of an animal nature — i.e. “animals” other than humans — have no eternal soul, but the soul dies with their body. Therefore, animals will not be saved and will not be in the kingdom. Aquinas seeks to define everything. Luther is happy to hope all things !!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. AECRM says:

    Interesting — thanks, Mark. I just thought it was a matter of common sense. If God created the world with all the critters that are in it — why would Heaven be lesser because God didn’t love animals enough to include them. Silly. Poor Aquinas. He has no doubt been blessed to discover that he was mistaken!

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